en.econostrum

           

MSSD 2016-2025 – Implement and measure the impact



planbleu

The 2016-2025 Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development has been adopted. The challenge that remains is to put in place a process to efficiently and jointly monitor the implementation of the 147 actions agreed upon by the Contracting Parties.



The crossing of information of scientific, institutional and associative sources will for example allow to watch the state of beaches and to set up the necessary actions in case of known pollution. Photo CGarcia
The crossing of information of scientific, institutional and associative sources will for example allow to watch the state of beaches and to set up the necessary actions in case of known pollution. Photo CGarcia
After a long revision process, the Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development for the period 2016-2025 (MSSD 2016-2025) was adopted in February 2016 at the Convention of the Contracting Parties to the Barcelona Convention in Athens.  Carrying on from the actions implemented between 2005 and 2015, it aims to federate regional initiatives around a green economy in the Mediterranean region by promoting interaction between socio-economic and environmental objectives. How can a proper implementation of this new MSSD be ensured, at both the regional and individual signatory levels? This issue is at the heart of the monitoring process to be put in place over the coming months under the auspices of the Plan Bleu, acting in this case in an observer role.

"The MSSD 2005 monitoring process relied on a set of 34 indicators, updated and published by the Plan Bleu every two years. The aim here is to put in place a much more efficient –and above all more participative- monitoring process," says Jean-Pierre Giraud, officer at the Plan Bleu. To this end, a first workshop was organized at the end of March in Saint-Laurent du Var (South of France). The fifteen or so country representatives and a number of experts were tasked with selecting a set of pertinent indicators among an initial list of 210 put forward within the scope of the MSSD.

The aim is to draw up a master plan to enable its concrete monitoring. A draft master plan could well be presented by the Plan Bleu as early as October 2016, but Jean-Pierre Giraud puts this prospect into perspective by saying, "we'll need more time to produce a genuinely operational tool.

Data sharing at the core of a vast project

For greater efficiency, data from different sources -scientific, institutional- will need to be cross-referenced by the international bodies. "The difficulty," says Jean-Pierre Giraud, "will be to get the countries to share the data in their possession." Sharing is not an automatic reflex in the various institutions involved. Crowdsourcing will also be encouraged by inviting participation from associations, whose work in the field is often of high quality. This will be particularly useful, for example, in monitoring the change in bird populations or the state of beaches and for putting in place the measures needed in the event of pollution.

Lastly, big data technology, which today enables large amounts of diverse data to be analysed using advanced algorithms, should contribute to the development of an efficient monitoring tool for this MSSD, which includes no less than 29 strategic guidelines with a total of 147 actions.

"The aim is to build a dashboard based on three dozen or so indicators," explains Jean-Pierre Giraud. "We have already filtered out a first set and we will be continuing the selection process over the next few months." 

In partnership with le Plan Bleu

Version française


 

Christiane Navas, NICE


Sunday, May 1st 2016


Article read 315 times


Articles which should interest to you
< >