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A strategy for a sustainable Mediterranean region





The process of developing the MSSD has resulted in a tool that can be adapted to the specific situation in each country. The aim is to facilitate the transition to a sustainable Mediterranean region.



Progress has been made as regards water access (photo MN)
Progress has been made as regards water access (photo MN)
Working towards a revised Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development.
 
The Strategy, developed in 2005, has helped to widen access to water and electricity while also improving the management of coastal environments. 21 Mediterranean countries, the Contracting Parties to the Barcelona Convention, will work towards a revised strategy in 2014 and 2015 according to Julien Le Tellier, who is overseeing the process at Plan Bleu.
 
The Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development was adopted in 2005. What is it exactly?
 
The MSSD is the result of a common aim of Mediterranean countries to contribute to economic development, reduce social disparities, develop more sustainable patterns of production and consumption and improve governance. This reference framework is broken down into targets. This means that countries bordering the Mediterranean have a tool available to help them devise sustainable development policies.
 
The process of developing the MSSD using a large panel of experts from all over the Mediterranean has resulted in a tool that can be adapted to the specific situation in each country. The aim is to facilitate the transition to a sustainable Mediterranean region.
 
Has this strategy produced tangible results?
 
The results of the MSSD are regularly monitored using a range of indicators. We are closer to achieving specific targets set in 2005 and progress has been made as regards water and electricity access, which was a key objective. The aim was to reduce by hlaf the number of people without access by half. This was a significant challenge in connection with the Millennium Development Goals. This success is down to a great degree of consensus in the North and South rims of the basin.

An extensive consultation process

Why is this document currently being revised?
 
Representatives from the Mediterranean countries requested it in Istanbul in December 2013. The strategy is not well known and not implemented widely enough. Difficulties may also be faced in communicating the strategy to decision-makers. When the strategy is being discussed among experts, everyone agrees on a key concern and often the recommendations. But what about their practical implementation? We want to boost national and local authorities' ownership of the strategy. This is why we have launched an extensive consultation process using a platform dedicated to revising the Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development.
 
A link must also be made with the Sustainable Development Goals currently being set out by the United Nations following Rio+20 in 2012. These objectives must be adapted to the specific needs of countries in the Mediterranean.
 
How will the MSSD revision process be carried out in practical terms?
 
The revision process was officially launched on 14 February 2014 by the Maltese Minister for Sustainable Development, the Environment and Climate Change, Leo Brincat.
 
The consultations with groups of experts and decision-makers will involve regional organisations and representatives from méditerranean countries. An initial consultation document was submitted to them on 10 April 2014. The finalised text of the “MSSD 2.0” will be submitted to the Contracting Parties to the Barcelona Convention for their approval in Greece in December 2015.
 
The Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development was adopted in 2005 (Photo PB DR)
The Mediterranean Strategy for Sustainable Development was adopted in 2005 (Photo PB DR)


Michel Neumuller, MARSEILLE


Tuesday, April 29th 2014



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